February 9, 2010

Yesterday was a national holiday – Prešeren Day.  It is the anniversary of the death of France Prešeren – the Slovene national poet.  Now it is a “cultural” and work-free holiday.  Almost everything was closed, with the exception of a few of the kavanas and the museums, which were not only open but also free for the day.  So, I took the opportunity to go to – not one but two – local museums.  I was actually surprised how many other people were there.  It always seems as though local museums only receive two kinds of visitors – out of town tourists and school groups.  At least this is what the curators at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum always tell me whenever I drag my Historical Geography of the U.S. class over there.

The first was the regional museum just up the ulica from my flat.  Although my guidebook describes the collection as “insipid”, it really wasn’t that bad.  It was larger than most of the local museums I’ve been to (primarily those in the Caribbean Basin) – and better organized – with artifacts from the Bronze Age through the Roman era and into the early 20th century.  However, given that the signs were (naturally) in Slovene and Italian, I can’t say that I learned anything about the history of the Istrian Peninsula.  The second (not entirely sure why there are two) was the ethnological museum, which definitely takes some effort to find.  There was more of an emphasis on cultural artifacts from daily life in and photographs from the early 20th century, which was interesting.  But it turned out to be unexpectedly small.  As in I walked up a flight of stairs only to find that there was no upper floor.

I also came across what I can only assume was a poetry reading in Prešeren Trg.  At least I hope that’s what it was.

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4 Responses to “”

  1. Jason Fisher said

    So aside from all of the exciting cultural things you’re learning, I’m fascinated by this “party pan”. I know I’m a guy and we have one track minds! What an amazing invention!

    So what does the butterfly symbolize?

  2. Patricia Burnette said

    Are you going to be taking classes to learn some of the fundamentals of the Slovenian language?

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